Tuesday’s Taste of the Corporate Playbook: Trashcan Trivia Basketball

Trashcan Trivia Basketball

Indoor Cooperative Game

Length of Activity: 15 minutes

Required materials: wastebasket, crumpled paper

How to Play:

  • Set up a wastebasket with three designated shooting distances (3 point range, 2 point range, 1 point range).
  • Ask work or trivia questions, and the team that answers first gets a chance to shoot a crumpled paper into the wastebasket from one of the three distances.
  • Members within each team must rotate who shoots.
  • The first team to a certain number of points wins.

This game strengthens a sense of teamwork and cooperation. Strategize within your team on which shooting distance to shoot from. Everyone is at an even playing field with this competitive and fun game, testing your knowledge and basketball skills all at once

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Tuesday’s Taste of the Corporate Playbook: Sniper

Sniper

Minute Move & Energizer

Length of Activity: 10 minutes

Required materials: None

How to Play:

  • Except for the game moderator, everyone else sits in a circle and closes their eyes.
  • The moderator then chooses one person to be the “Sniper” by quietly tapping on them, who will try to “snipe” people by winking at them.
  • Everyone opens their eyes again and starts looking around the room looking for the Sniper winking.
  • If winked at by the Sniper, you must wait 5 seconds before dramatically fake-dying, visibly letting the group know you’ve been winked at.
  • If people think they know who the Sniper is, they can whisper their guess to the moderator.
  • The game ends when somebody guesses the Sniper, or the Sniper eliminates every person.

Try this game before a meeting while the team is already sitting in a circle. This game’s dramatic fake-deaths make for a fun game that gets everybody involved. Be as sneaky as your can in this game and see who can last the longest without getting caught.

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Playground Story of the Week

A positive playground story from Coach Christina

Playworks’ Junior Coach program allows students to help our coaches facilitate recess, and more importantly has the power to teach these students valuable, wide-ranging skills along the way. This heartwarming story shows the pure kindness of a few Junior Coaches, and perfectly exemplifies what Playworks hopes to bring out in every kid.


          Every few weeks, my Junior Coaches get a chance to purchase prizes from the Junior Coach Store using Stars they’ve earned throughout the year. They earn Stars a number of ways: by coming to all their shifts, meeting weekly goals, and receiving Junior Coach Awards such as The Positivity Award and The Helping Hand Award. When I opened the store a few weeks ago, three of my Junior Coaches who I will call Chris, Matthew, and Thomas, inspired me to create a new Junior Coach Award. This is what happened:

          Thomas was the first of the three to visit the store, but despite seriously considering buying a bouncy ball (one of the more expensive prizes), he left empty handed. Next, Chris visited the store. He asked me if a Junior Coach could buy a prize and then give it to another Junior Coach. I told him yes and watched as he reached for the bouncy ball that Thomas had wanted. Next, Matthew bought a magic grow alien. I didn’t realize it until later, but this alien was for Chris. Lastly, Thomas and Chris walked up to me with big smiles and Stars in hand. They wanted to buy a parachute man for Matthew, but neither had enough Stars to pay for it individually. They wanted to know if they could buy it together, so I said yes and they bought it together by combining their Stars.

          These actions made me smile for so many reasons: the way Chris asked for my permission to give his prize to someone else, the way Matthew bought something for Chris after Chris bought another person a prize, and the fact that Thomas spent all but three of his Stars on Matthew when a few minutes earlier he had been unwilling to spend them on himself. These three are such good kids and I am fortunate to be in a position to let them know when they do something awesome like this. As a result, I awarded The Generosity Junior Coach Award to each of these boys. As I explained how they had earned the award, the boys lit up and I could see how great this incident made them feel.

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Tuesday’s Taste of the Corporate Playbook: Password

Password

Indoor Cooperative Game

Length of Activity: 15 minutes

Required materials: None

How to Play:

  • In teams of two, one person is designated as the guesser, and one as the clue-giver.
  • The objective is for the clue-giver to get their teammate to guess the “password” given just one-word clues related to this “password”.
  • One clue-giver comes up with a “password”, and tells all of the other clue-givers playing.
  • Starting with the person who came up with the “password”, the first time a one-word clue is given to his or her teammate, the guesser can try to guess the password for 10 points.
  • If wrong, the next team gets to try for 9 points, and so on.
  • The round ends when the “password” is guessed or there are 10 incorrect guesses, and the game ends when one team reaches 25 points (can be more or less).
  • This game is typically played with 2-4 teams.

To be good at this game, it is important to know your partner well so that you can think of passwords only he or she will guess. Think of references the other teams won’t understand to be good at this game. This game is great for strengthening relationships, and also for giving pairs a chance to learn more about each other.

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Tuesday’s Taste of the Corporate Playbook: 20 Questions

20 Questions

Indoor Cooperative Game

Length of Activity: 15 minutes

Required materials: None

How to Play:

  • One person in the group thinks of an item and does not tell anybody.
  • The rest of the group gets 20 Yes or No questions to ask this person to help them figure out the item.
  • Guesses do not count as questions.

Combine critical thinking and collective teamwork on this simple yet very entertaining game. Try to ask the best set of questions as a whole to narrow down the answers. For best results, think of a unique item that almost everybody knows, such as an office item in plain sight that often goes overlooked.

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